2016 Summer Festival

Time for Three’s Nikki Chooi Joins Met Opera as New Concertmaster

Nikki Chooi begins as Concertmaster of the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra… after stopping by to perform in the San Juan Islands!

Nikki Chooi, one of Time for Three’s two violinists, has accepted the Concert Master position with the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra, beginning in September, 2016. Time for Three opened our Nineteenth Season, which began with our annual Lopez Island concert on August 4 and continued on Orcas Island August 5 and 6.

Time for Three

Time for Three

Time for Three, whose other members are Nick Kendall, violin, and Ranaan Meyer, double bass, specializes in original genre-defying arrangements, fusing classical artistry and tradition with pop hits and folk staples. All three members of Time for Three graduated from the Curtis Institute of Music; the trio has been featured in a full-length special on PBS, has appeared at Carnegie Hall and on Dancing with the Stars. 

The ensemble has been called “Glowing… very hot… marked by great intensity of feeling… impassioned…” by NBC. 

Sir Simon Rattle, chief conductor of the Berlin Philharmonic, said about Time for Three, “Simply put, they’re a knockout! Three benevolent monsters – monsters of ability and technique surely. But also conveyers of an infectious joy that I find both touching and moving. I would recommend them not only for entertainment value, but also for anyone looking to see how all types of American music can develop, when life and passion such as this are breathed into it.”

Violinist Nikki Chooi

Violinist Nikki Chooi

 Upon Mr. Chooi’s departure, recent Juilliard graduate Charles Yang will fill out Time for Three’s musical complement.

Read more about Nikki Chooi’s new adventure in the New York Times: 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/07/08/arts/music/metropolitan-opera-new-concertmaster-nikki-chooi.html?smid=pl-share

and the Violin Channel: https://www.theviolinchannel.com/nikki-chooi-new-york-metropolitan-opera-concertmaster/.

2016 Summer Festival

                 The 2016 Orcas Island Chamber Music Festival was a Rousing Success!

 From the kick-off weekend with the inimitable “Time for Three,” all the way through to the innovative menu options of the final “Á la Carte!” concerts, the 2016 Orcas Island Chamber Music Festival took listeners on a moving journey through centuries of music and a spectrum of emotions.

Artistic Director and violist Aloysia Friedmann crafted two weeks of fabulous concerts, filled with renowned artists, including:
             The Argentinian rhythms and fire of the Ginastera 1st Quartet
             The melancholy and excitement of Shostakovich’s Piano Quintet
             Smetana’s passionate and melodic Piano Trio in G minor
             Dvorak’s luscious E-flat Piano Quartet
             The exciting Dohnanyi Sextet
             Poulenc’s brilliant clarinet sonata
             The dramatic new Rhapsodos by Betinis
             The lyrical Horn Trio by Brahms

We welcomed amazing artists who performed for the Orcas Island Chamber Music Festival for the first time, and welcomed back Festival friends. Flying in from England for the Northwest premiere of Abbie Betinis’s Rhapsodos, clarinetist Michael Collins performed with pianist Jon Kimura Parker.
Other major artists new to Orcas this year included pianists Anne-Marie McDermott and Craig Sheppard, hornist Julie Landsman, cellists Beth Rapier and Anthony Ross, and Time for Three, and we welcomed back many Festival favorites with great enthusiasm: the Miró Quartet, violinists Chee-Yun and Sandy Yamamoto, and violist Toby Appel!
Aloysia and Jackie hosted a special event on August 15th and 16th, celebrating the legacy of violinist Jascha Heifetz, featuring pianist/violinist Dr. Ayke Agus, who worked with Heifetz as a violin student and as piano accompanist to his studio. She shared stories about Heifetz, including excerpts from the documentary God’s Fiddler.             

A heart-felt thank you to all who made this 19th Season of Orcas Island Chamber Music Festival such a glowing success. The memories linger long after the last bow was taken.